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Posts Tagged ‘persian new year’

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Today marks the thirteenth day of the new year. We did not go on a picnic but we did throw away our sprouts in a stream –or we pretended that we did. I threw the sprouts in the water in a local park, but then took them out just a few yards down the stream as I did not want to pollute the water. It was fun!

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The Persian New Year holiday is officially over and as of tomorrow everyone in Iran goes back to work or school.

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Today is the first day of spring which coincides with the first day of the Persian new year. The official time of the transition from winter to spring was last night at 10:48. I made it home from school just in time to sit around and celebrate with J and Indi.

The picture above is my Haft Sin which we are supposed to make where each items is symbolic. Once again, I am lazy so I am going to cut an paste the smart people from Wikipedia who have taken the time to do a nice write up about it.

Haft Sīn (هفت سین) or the seven ‘S’s is a major tradition of Nowruz. The haft sin table includes seven specific items starting with the letter ‘S’ or Sīn (س) in Persian alphabet). The items symbolically correspond to seven creations and holy immortals protecting them. Originally called Haft Shīn, the term was changed to Haft Sīn after the Iranian people adopted Islam, because wine (sharab) was one of the Seven ‘Sh’s, and drinking intoxicants is forbidden in Islam.[citation needed]. The Haft Sin has evolved over time, but has kept its symbolism. Traditionally, families attempt to set as beautiful a Haft Sīn table as they can, as it is not only of traditional and spiritual value, but also noticed by visitors during Nowruzi visitations and is a reflection of their good taste.

The Haft Sīn items are:

  • sabzehwheat, barley or lentil sprouts growing in a dish – symbolizing rebirth
  • samanu – a sweet pudding made from wheat germ – symbolizing affluence
  • senjed – the dried fruit of the oleaster tree – symbolizing love
  • sīrgarlic – symbolizing medicine
  • sībapples – symbolizing beauty and health
  • somaqsumac berries – symbolizing (the color of) sunrise
  • serkehvinegar – symbolizing age and patience

Other items on the table may include:

Happy New Year to all who celebrate this wonderful day!

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