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Maria De Barros

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A couple of weekends ago we went to a concert at the Getty Center. I am always happy to go to the Getty center because I love going to museum and this one happens to have an amazing garden and view of LA as a bonus. I have been to a few concerts at the Getty in the past few years, but this last one was by far the most amazing experience EVER.

There were three musician and the one that made a lasting impression on me personally was Maria de Barros. What an amazing singer, her music touched my soul. Her band was also mazing. I had never seen people actually get up and dance at the Getty center. Her warmth was felt by everyone in the auditorium. It was just a unique and terrific experience. I really like the sound of Portuguese and because of her I like the language even more.

J and I bought one of her CDs and continued to listen to her on our way home from the Getty. Maria de Barros was gracious enough to sign our CD followed by a warm hug and kiss, well just to me, because by then J was wondering off on his own, so he missed out!! One thing that came to mind was the fact that it was nice to see a real artist that connects with her crowd and is a gracious performer, unlike all the fluff and untalented singers that we hear nowadays on the radio.

We tried taking pictures, but the lighting wasn’t right in the auditorium. I was able to take a picture of her outside, not the greatest picture, but you can still see how beautiful she is! You can purchase her CDs through her website which are sold through Amazon.

The LA Times did a nice review of her performance which is worth reading:

MUSIC REVIEW

Live: Maria de Barros

Dancing the night away with a diva-in-waiting
By Don Heckman, Special to The Times
March 3, 2008

Maria de Barros came onstage like a colorful whirlwind of Cape Verdean exhilaration at the Getty Center’s Williams Auditorium on Saturday night. Engaging the full-house crowd from her very first note, she sang and danced her way through a colorful collection of songs rooted in the island culture of her parents’ birthplace.

Although the multilingual De Barros was born in Senegal and lived in Mauritania before moving to Rhode Island as a teenager, she has come to prominence as a highly visible exponent of Cape Verdean music. Her Getty performance, however, clearly demonstrated that — although she is the goddaughter of reigning Cape Verde diva Cesária Évora — De Barros is creating an expressive vocal style that is uniquely her own.

Much of the material in her too-brief set was drawn from her second CD, “Danca ma Me” (Dance With Me). “Rosinha,” the tale of a woman awaiting the return of a lover, embraced the deep Cape Verdean tradition of songs associated with loss and longing, tinged with the poignancy of Brazilian saudade.

Other songs — “Bo Ke Nha Boy,” Espaco Infinito” and “Riberonzinha” among them — dipped into the traditional mornas and coladeiras that first came to the attention of Western listeners via the recordings of Évora. And “Sol di Manha” added the vigor of funana rhythms, energized by the stirring percussive sound of the ferro, which is nothing more than a piece of metal vigorously scraped and tapped with a spoon.

In each case, De Barros enhanced the traditional rhythms with other elements, sometimes infusing them with the spice of Brazilian sambas and Afro-Cuban salsas, always enlivening them with the dark, velvet timbres of her voice, her emotive phrasing and her sheer enthusiasm for making music.

Those qualities triggered effusive responses from the crowd, especially the substantial numbers of Cape Verdeans present, many of whom lined the sides of the auditorium and the edges of the stage in dancing posses, occasionally waving the multi-starred flag of their native island.

De Barros, after drawing the audience into singing a selection from her soon to be released third album, “Morbeza,” slipped into the aisles, winding up her engaging performance with up close and personal contact with her enthusiastic listeners.

Opening the evening, singer-songwriter Waldemar Bastos delivered several stirring numbers affirming his reputation as the “voice of Angola.”

And the evening wrapped on a high point with a characteristically vigorous blend of African and Cuban rhythms from Ricardo Lemvo and Makina Loca.

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